The Delaware County Symphony is a seventy-member community orchestra, established in 1971, and dedicated to providing outstanding musical experiences for residents of the Delaware County area. Concerts are given at Neumann University's Meagher Theatre in the Thomas A. Bruder, Jr. Life Center located in Aston, Pennsylvania.
In the News
An article about the first concert of the DCS season appeared in the latest issue of The Hunt - Life in the Brandywine Valley. To read the article, please click here.
  
Music Director Tim Ribchester spoke on Comcast Newsmakers about the upcoming 2014-2015 concert season. Click here to watch the interview.
   
For a comprehensive listing of magazine articles about the Delaware County Symphony and interviews with members and guest soloists, click here.
       
Philadelphia Orchestra Bassoonist Performs at Next Concert     
 
Philadelphia Orchestra Principal Bassoonist Daniel Matsukawa will be performing the Weber Bassoon Concerto with the DCS at the December 7 Symphony Series concert. Mr. Matsukawa has been a recipient of numerous awards and prizes, including a solo concerto debut in Carnegie Hall at the age of 18. He was also featured in a Young Artist’s Showcase on New York’s WQXR classical radio station. Since then he has appeared as soloist with several other orchestras, including The Philadelphia Orchestra, the National Symphony, the New York String Orchestra under Alexander Schneider, the Curtis Symphony, the Virginia Symphony, the Auckland (New Zealand) Philharmonic, and the Sapporo Symphony in Japan. Prior to his post with The Philadelphia Orchestra, Mr. Matsukawa served as principal bassoon with the National Symphony in Washington D.C., the Saint Louis Symphony, the Virginia Symphony, and the Memphis Symphony. He is a regular member of the faculties at both the Curtis Institute of Music and the Boyer College of Music at Temple University.

The program will begin with Colorfields by Armando Bayolo. Written in 2007, this work was inspired by the last two panels in Mark Rothko’s series of five murals made for the Holyoke Center at Harvard University. The final work on the concert will be the magnificent Symphony. No. 5 by Dmitri Shostakovich. This emotional and inspiring symphony was Shostakovich's courageous response to the terror inflicted by Joseph Stalin on the people of the Soviet Union during the 1930s. Tickets for the concert can be obtained at the door or by visiting our Tickets page.